Art Wall

With an opening reception on Friday August 25, the David M. Hunt Library in Falls Village will premiere the group exhibit, Altars, Amulets and Shrines, curated by Gay Schempp. This exhibit expresses eight artists’ exploration of personal altars, amulets or shrines used to create external representations of interior mysteries, memories or links between people, between things and between realms. The works range in a variety of disciplines and materials including sculpture, ceramics, printmaking, encaustic, assemblage and jewelry. Featured in the exhibit are works by Mary Lou Alberetti, Lori Barker, Suzanne Benton, Robert Dansik, George Herrick, Barbara Jaroch, Gay Schempp, and Diane Wright. A reception with refreshments for the artists will be held from 5pm to 7pm on Friday, August 25. This event is free and open to the public. The exhibit will be on display through Friday, September 22. For more information call the library at 860-824-7424 or visit huntlibrary.org.

Gay Schempp, the curator of Altars, Amulets and Shrines, in a statement about the exhibit wrote, “People have been creating devotional memorials since the beginning of recorded time to the present. The impulse to assemble and “make special,” places for objects that nourish us and act as reservoirs of spiritual energy are present in our homes and places of work as well as our places of worship. When we gather together family photos on a mantelpiece, or carry a good luck charm, we compose a language of materials, the messages of which may include a memorial, memory space, honoring space, or meditation space.”

“An object of art becomes a shrine when we make it a box…a box in which a spirit may take up residence. It’s where we may find the interior world, the microcosm, that we’re all looking for.” Thomas Moore, The Reenchantment of Everyday Life.

All the artworks in Altars, Amulets and Shrines were created for the exhibit which, after closing at the Hunt Library on September 23, will travel to the Underground Gallery in Collinsville, October 13-29, and the Silvermine Center for the Arts in New Canaan, November 5-December 25.

ARTISTS

Mary Lou Alberetti – New Fairfield, Ceramic reliefs and mixed media
Lori Barker – Goshen, Mixed Media Painter and Sculptor
Suzanne Benton – Ridgefield, Sculptor and Printmaker
Robert Dancik -Beacon Falls, Jeweler and Sculptor
George Herrick – West Hartford, Mixed media
Barbara Jaroch – Hartford, Assemblage
Gay Schempp – Winsted, Encaustic Painter and Sculptor
Diane Wright – Canton, Mixed Media Sculptor

In October, David M. Hunt Library will host Connecticut Academy for The Arts’ ART BOMB: TOYMAKERS CAFÉ, an exhibit of young CAFTA art students’ work inspired by the popular eatery run by Ann and Greg Bidou in Falls Village. A reception with refreshments for the artists will be held from 4pm to 6pm on Thursday, October 19. This event is free and open to the public. For more information call the library at 860-824-7424 or visit huntlibrary.org.

The exhibit was conceived by Teresa and John Sullivan, co-founders of Connecticut Academy for the Arts, as an inter-community exchange between their students located in Torrington and the environs of the Bidou’s restaurant, which was recently hailed as a “burger and waffle oasis” by Connecticut Magazine. Artworks will include limited edition framed prints from a variety of media including painting, drawing, and mixed media. Subjects will include things readily seen at the café—motorcycles, corgis, customers, and coffee and everything Toymakers!

Describing what an Art Bomb is, Teresa Sullivan explained, “Our students enjoy making “Art Bombs” because it gives them an opportunity to learn more about diverse businesses and, at the same time use their talents to give back to various charities throughout the community. They have been working very hard on this project since early summer and have even written and recorded a song to go along with a puppet presentation inspired by Toymaker’s Cafe. They are very excited about their newest Art Bomb at the Hunt Library.”

For information about CAFTA visit www.cafta.info or call 860 201-5706.


In July and August, the David M. Hunt Library in Falls Village will present an exhibit by Gail Jacobson,
Complicated Dreams. A reception with refreshments for the artist will be held from 5pm to 7pm on
Friday, July 21. This event is free and open to the public. The exhibit will be on display through
Saturday, August 18. For more information call the library at 860-824-7424 or visit huntlibrary.org.

The Cornwall artist’s new works feature abstracts that suggest the marbled endpapers found in antique books. Introduced to Europeans by the Persian Tajiks in Istanbul, the technique was inspired by a kind of paper decoration invented in 12th-century Japan called suminagashi which means “the floating of colors,” an apt description of Gail Jacobson’s new paintings.

The artist said of her work, “My dreams are full of people I’ve never met, places I’ve never been, thoughts I’ve never had and words I’ve never said. Plots twist and overlap. People morph into other beings. There are no beginnings and no endings. Some are dark and foreboding, jolting me awake. Some are light and joyful, making me wish to sleep a little longer just to enjoy them. Above all they are surprising and complicated. This foray into Abstract Painting reflects these dreams. And yes, I do dream in color.”

Gail Jacobson graduated from college with a degree in art. After her marriage to her husband Jeff
they proceeded to move across the country and to England, settling in Cornwall, CT over 20 years ago
when they bought a 100-year-old hay barn and converted it into their home. New materials and
techniques inspire her to create.

In addition to college, she studied for 4 years at Silvermine Art Center in Norwalk, CT, served as the
President of the Ridgefield Guild of Artists, founded Art@TheDump in Cornwall and served on the
board of the Rose Algrant Art Show, also in Cornwall. She has been a member of various non-profit
boards including the Cornwall Historical Society where she designs posters, flyers and notecards for
their various programs and activities. Her skills have also produced a playbill, a menu for a local
restaurant and a book cover among other items, reflecting her growing interest in graphic arts.

Judith Wyer’s new exhibit of oil paintings, Presence, will be on display at the David M. Hunt Library in Falls Village from June 16 through July 15. The exhibit features a selection of the artist’s figurative and still life paintings ranging throughout her career. A reception with refreshments for the artist will be held on Friday, June 16, from 5pm to 7pm. This event is free and open to the public.
Judith Wyer, a North Canaan resident, has referred to the act of painting as “extending and relishing the momentary.” This is an apt description of the work in Presence. Ms. Wyer’s figurative paintings are inhabited with people quiet, pensive and held in place by circumstance and commitment: commuting on a train or waiting for one; museum gallery security standing still as a posing model; universal experiences of claiming private space in public places, everyone solitary, even in groups.

Balanced with the figurative canvases are equally quiet still lifes of flowers, ceramics, and glass. All of Ms. Wyer’s paintings have themes in common—neutral tones and soft, sinewy lines, often set off with a vibrant burst of color, a red or purple belonging to a flower or a central figure’s clothing. Describing the paintings, the artist said, “Presence is interaction where one form defines and demarcates the other, be it still life or figurative. The ideal is to find balance and harmony in such interdependence thereby creating a quiet dynamic.”

Judith Wyer studied at several institutions in New York including Brooklyn College, the Art Students League, National Academy of Design, and School of Visual Arts. She studied with Jacob Lawrence who was an early and lasting influence on the artist. Her work has been reviewed in the New York Times and she exhibits regularly.


Beginning May 12, the David M. Hunt Library in Falls Village, CT will feature the exhibit New Beginnings, a group show by Canaan Art League featuring painting, photography and sculpture. A reception with refreshments for the artists will be held on Friday May 12 from 5 to 7PM and the exhibit will be on display through June 10. This event is free and open to the public. A portion of the sales will benefit the library. For more information or to inquire about sales, please contact the library at 860-824-7424, drop by at 63 Main St in Falls Village, or visit huntlibrary.org.
Canaan Art League was started in 2008 by five friends who were looking for a place to be creative. The Congregational Church in East Canaan was such a place. Eventually the group grew from five to twenty and more. They meet once a week on Wednesday afternoon. Contact the group for more information at 860-824-0124.

Canaan Art Leagues members exhibiting in New Beginnings include Beverly Adams (watercolor), Ruth Adotte (pastel), Barbara Austin (oil), Betty Cosgrove (watercolor), Janet Couch (acrylic), Ned Gow (acrylics), Dale Janssen (oil), Lynn Martin (acrylics), Patricia Medvecky (watercolor), Hope Mongeau (watercolor), Lynn Monnier (watercolor), Janet Newman (acrylic), Joan Palmer (watercolor), Frieve Savage (photography), Olga Swede (watercolor) and Lois Van Cleef (pastel).


In February, the David M. Hunt Library in Falls Village, CT will feature Air, Land, and Sky, an exhibit of paintings by Sarah Martinez. A reception with refreshments for the artist will be held on Friday February 10 from 5 to 7pm. This event is free and open to the public. For more information about the artist or to inquire about sales, please contact the library at 860-824-7424, drop by at 63 Main St in Falls Village, or visit huntlibrary.org. Sarah Martinez’s work can be seen at www.sarahbmartinez.com.

Sarah Martinez was born and raised in northwest Connecticut, studied art and philosophy at Université Concordia in Montréal, honed her craft in Brooklyn, NY, and then returned home to the Litchfield Hills. Here she works as a painter creating both abstract acrylic works as well as watercolor and ink illustrations for image licensing and archival prints. In her abstract work, Sarah uses primarily acrylic paint and palette knifes laying thick bursts of color in moments of serenity and storm. These paintings are clearly intuitive, allowing an atmosphere to emerge through playful eruptions of color and markings. Her watercolor and ink work focuses on the natural world, these paintings are most often representational in form yet surreal and whimsical in the use of color.
Sarah works from her home studio in Falls Village, CT where she lives with her husband and two young sons. Sarah’s original artwork is represented by The White Gallery in Lakeville, CT. Her watercolor and ink work can be found online through her shop Snoogs & Wilde Art as well through various retail collaborations including Papyrus Paper Company and Urban Outfitters.
A portion of all sales in this exhibit benefit the David M. Hunt Library.

12x12

The David M. Hunt Library in Falls Village will host its popular year-end flash art exhibit, 12X12 2016: The

Skill of Hand & Head, on Saturday, December 10 with a reception from 6pm to 8pm. Original works by 53

local artists are all in a 12” x 12” format, priced at $100 each, and sold off-the- wall.  Works will be replaced on

the wall as they are sold. Remaining art will be on display through Saturday, January 7. The reception with

refreshments is free and open to the public. A portion of the art sales will benefit the library.

12X12 is presented in a uniform grid on the Hunt Artwall creating a salon-style exhibit. Installed alphabetically

by artist, all manner of genre and media are jumbled up together. Among the 53 artists declared at press time are

eight artists exhibiting in 12X12 for the first time: Pamela Berkeley, Bonnie Evans, Jill Gibbons, Ken

Musselman, Babs Perkins, Anouk Schmitt, Craig Wickwire, and Natalie Will. Returning artists include Heather

Allyn, John Atchley, Lori Barker, Mary Anne Carley, Erika Crofut, Robert Cronin, Karen Culbreth, Lynn Curtis,

John Dildine, Virginia Dildine, Sergei Fedorjaczenko, Zoe Fedorjaczenko, Israel Fitch, Richard Griggs, John

Hodgson, Shaari Horowitz, Joey Jablonski, Gail Jacobson, Amanda Kauftheil, Sallie Ketcham, Garth Kobal,

Michael Lampro, Danielle Mailer, Louise March, Willie Marlowe, Sarah Martinez, Randy McKee, Roger

McKee, Lonnie Miles, Hope Mongeau, Terri Moore, Patty Mullins, Phyllis Nauts, Janet Newman, Charles

Noyes, Karin Noyes, Joan Palmer, Robert Andrew Parker, Bernie Re, Tom Schaefer, Diane Schapira, Joel

Schapira, Annike Timmermans, Kathy Wismar, and Judith Wyer. There will be up to three pieces per artist as

space permits.

kimmelman-16-ecard

In November, the David M. Hunt Library in Falls Village will host artist Harvey Kimmelman’s self-curated exhibit, “All Over the Map. A reception with refreshments for the artist will be held on Saturday, November 5 from 4pm to 6pm. This event is free and open to the public. The exhibit will be in on display through Saturday, December 3.

A resident of Sheffield, Massachusetts and a member of the Housatonic Valley Art League, Harvey Kimmelman’s work is decidedly classical. Though expansive in media from painting to sculpture, Mr. Kimmelman’s exhibit at the Hunt Library in November will feature many watercolors with subjects including those in Italy, Maine, California, and some of more cerebral nature as the artist says, “from my head.” Watercolor’s immediacy and luminosity create a freshness and uncertainty of outcome.

He captures emotions and moods that the viewer can relate to, whether the subject be a landscape or figure. Relying on classical foundations, Mr. Kimmelman is greatly influenced by the Master’s strong elements of composition, drawing, light and shade, earthy colors and textures and incorporates as much of these as into his work as he can achieve.

A native of New York City, Harvey Kimmelman attended The High School of Art & Design. Throughout a career in advertising, he continued to study drawing and anatomy with Robert Beverly Hale at the Art Students League; figure drawing with Joan Mitchell Blumenthal; sculpture with Granville Carter at the National Academy of Design; fresco painting with Alma Ortolan in Vittorio Veneto, Italy; and watercolor with Pat Hogan at her workshop in Great Barrington, MA.

Harvey Kimmelman’s work can be seen at hvart.org and on Facebook.

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EPSON scanner image

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In October the David M. Hunt Library in Falls Village will host artist Robert Cronin’s self-curated exhibit, “Now ‘n Then” featuring a small selection of his artworks from various years within his very full career. A reception with refreshments for the artist will be held on Saturday, October 8 from 4pm to 6pm. This event is free and open to the public. The exhibit will be in on display through Saturday, October, 29.

Mr. Cronin recently turned 80 and, as many know from his Facebook postings, he offers a look at work from various years throughout his career, both abstract and figurative. Lately there are the minimalist paintings on paper in solid colors. In reference to how many pieces he may have in a given series, he said “Some series of paintings through the years are not extensive enough for full exhibitions but can be just as good as those that go on and on.”

At his 80th Birthday Party, a private affair hosted by Mary O’Brien at her now-closed restaurant, Chaiwalla, in Salisbury, Mr. Cronin had selected work to suit the occasion–one piece each from certain series throughout his career. “Now ‘n Then” offers various examples of paintings from such histories over a span of sixty years including student works from R.I.S.D. in the late 1950s, a unique collage/combine from his MFA days at Cornell University in 1961, a small series of strictly black and white oil paintings from 2010 which were done between a larger group of imaginary still life paintings and a following group of minimalist color paintings. Going further through the present, there will be a few very small framed color works from 2011 which were the beginnings of a much larger commitment. Unframed works on paper will round out the exhibit.

The artist said “If an artist has a more obvious commercial appeal through the years, a steadier career, financially, may more likely happen. I think it was the critic/essayist Clement Greenberg who said, regarding artists that are willing to take greater risks, ‘you’re lucky if you get more than five years out there.’”

Public high points in Mr. Cronin’s career started when he moved to Manhattan in 1980 and lived there until he moved in June 1987 to Connecticut. In those years Cronin was well received with six one-man exhibitions in NYC as well as in England, Switzerland, Germany, Japan, and Canada. Notable top level exhibitions include a fine show again at the Zabriskie Gallery in NYC in 2007. He muses….”There is still a hopeful feeling that it could always happen again”.

Robert Cronin’s work is included in the permanent collections of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, the Brooklyn Museum, the Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, Worcester Art Museum, the National Academy and the National Air and Space Museum in D.C., among others. He was awarded two Massachusetts Artists Foundation Grants in the 1970s, an Individual Support Grant from the Gottlieb Foundation in 1991 and in 2008 won First Prize in the Member’s Exhibition at the Washington Art Association in Washington Depot, Ct.

Robert Cronin’s work can be seen at robertcroninart.com and on Facebook.

Foster 16 ecard

From July 30 through September 3, the David M. Hunt Library in Falls Village, CT will feature the exhibit, Ben Foster: Recent Paintings. A reception with refreshments for the artist will be held on Saturday, July 30, 4-6pm. This event is free and open to the public.

Ben Foster, the Litchfield painter, is known for lush and expansive landscape canvases of New England’s natural. Speaking of his experiences in painting, Mr. Foster said “I’ve been looking at so many different things and vistas on this amazing earth of ours, and they all call out to be painted, they are all so lively and interesting and beautiful. I’ve painted seascapes, landscapes of mountains, landscapes of rivers and streams, landscapes with houses, landscapes with roads. I love painting gardens and flowers and butterflies and birds. I find even ordinary weeds like mulleins to be interesting. When I come indoors I see compositions of fruits and vegetables just waiting to be put on canvas. This past winter I found a night scene of city streets with neon signs and cars that provided a change of pace from my usual peaceful landscapes. And then there’s the look of paint on canvas, just that, pigments, the look of one color next to another, different textures. This has led me to paint abstractions so that the paintings are reduced to their painterly essentials. It’s all visually compelling to me, and that’s why I’m a painter.”

Parker 16 ecard

In June and July, the David M. Hunt Library in Falls Village will host “Danbury Brides & Other Paintings,” a new exhibit by the artist Robert Andrew Parker. A reception with refreshments will be held on Saturday, June 18 from 4pm to 6pm. This event is free and open to the public. The exhibit will be on display through July 23.

“Danbury Brides” includes work by Mr. Parker with the cooperation of his New York gallery, Davis & Langdale. Consisting largely of landscapes and portraits, the work is vintage Parker, both playful and evocative. On a recent visit to his studio in West Cornwall, the artist was full of the same irreverent charm which radiates from his paintings, whether the subjects in the Danbury Brides series or in his depiction of dogs, goats and other animals. The Danbury Brides are paintings from 1980s matrimonial listings in the Danbury News-Times. Landscapes also figure big here: ancient ruins, the Machapuchare summit in Nepal, The Hudson Valley rendered in abstract visions that evoke lingering memories. The poet Marianne Moore once said, “Robert Andrew Parker is one of the most accurate and at the same time most unliteral of painters. He combines the mystical and the actual, working both in an abstract and in a realistic way.” This exhibit reflects all of the qualities that this great artist is known for.

Robert Andrew Parker’s artworks have appeared in the pages of The New Yorker, The New York Times, and Esquire just to name a few. His drawings and paintings have accompanied the writings of Franz Kafka, Vladimir Nabokov, W. H. Auden, and Marianne Moore. His work is in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Whitney Museum, the Morgan Library and Museum, and private collections throughout the world. Most recently, Parker was the subject of a Century Masters career retrospective at The Century Association in New York.

Besides being a foremost American artist, illustrator, and printmaker, Parker is also a writer and a working musician. Bob continues to perform with his band mates locally at the Interlaken Inn and other spots.

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In May, the Artwall of the David M. Hunt Library in Falls Village, CT will present Two Imaginations Re-Imagined, featuring the work of Lori and Ernie Barker. A reception for the artists will take place on Saturday, May 7 from 4pm to 6pm. This event is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served. The exhibit will be on display through June 11.

Lori and Ernie Barker were owners of the Artists’ Path in Bantam, CT from 2012 to December of 2015. The Yankee Magazine named the Artists’ Path the ‘best small gallery in CT’ in 2014. Having closed their gallery, the Barker’s are now free to exhibit their artworks in local public spaces and chose the Hunt Library Artwall for their first exhibit.

Lori’s work is an imitation of her life, an ongoing collage, deep with excitement and mysteries. “Using the right side of my brain, as an artist for 40 years, I speak to the left on fewer occasions now. Pictures form my logic, numbers become elements for collages and philosophical thoughts turn into hues of the palette. Much of my art is formed by dreams and executed by intuition.” Photography, paint, fabric and unusual materials comprise the palette of Lori’s art. She has developed her style in manipulated image transfers, engraved photo transfers on metal and mixed media collage.

Ernie’s primary love is working with wood, its color, texture and grain. Most of his artistic efforts are involved in sculpting the human figure from native fruit and hardwoods in such a way as to allow the natural grain and colors to best define the form contained within the log or block. Lately, Ernie has been concentrating on working natural slab wood into desks and small coffee and end tables.

Cigar Box 16 ecard2
The Hunt Library in Falls Village will host a reception on April 2, 5-7PM for the exhibit “Cigar Box Tradition,” featuring work by over 40 artists. The artworks all employ cigar boxes, wooden and cardboard, as their base with pieces ranging from painting and assemblage to sculpture, found objects and mechanics. This reception is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served. A portion of the art sales will benefit the library. The exhibit will be open through Saturday, April 30.

The art offered in this exhibit reveals local artists’ personal take on the humble tradition of the cigar box. Lilly Woodworth, a Sharon artist and organizer of Cigar Box Tradition, attributes her interest in this humble medium to the work of such eclectic artists as Richard Diebenkorn, Kurt Schwitters and Giovanni Fattori. “They are lions in the canon of painting, even when they roar with their intimate scaled work. This exhibition gives our vibrant local art community the chance to respond to this ubiquitous medium in their own vocabulary, color and intuition. It doesn’t get any better than that.”

The artists in Cigar Box Tradition include Ernie Barker, Lori Barker, Joseph Brien, Sharon Brisnehan, Erika Crofut, Robert Cronin, Lynn Curtis, Patricia Decker, John Dildine, Virginia Dildine, Lesley Ehlers, Sergei Fedorjaczenko, Zoe Fedorjaczenko, Laurie Fortin, George-Ann Gowan, Frank Grusauskas, Sharon Hamilton, John Hodgson, Shaari Horowitz, Joey Jablonski, Gail Jacobson, Amanda Kauftheil, Sallie Ketchum, Norma Kimmel, Garth Kobal, Tom Lotas, Lillian Lovitt, Willie Marlowe, Colleen McGuire, Roger McKee, Terri Moore, Patty Mullins, Robert Andrew Parker, Susan Rand, Bernie Re, Tom Schaefer, Diane Shapira, Joel Shapira, Jude Streng, Annike Timmermans, Carol Timolat, and Lilly Woodworth.

Greenman 16 PC ecard
Art Exhibit: The Green Man Art Project by the Students of Lee H. Kellogg School
Reception: Saturday, March 5, noon to 2PM
On exhibit through March 26, 2016

During March, the David M. Hunt Library in Falls Village, CT will host the Green Man Art Project featuring artwork by students from Lee H. Kellogg School, commemorating the library’s 125th anniversary year. A reception for the students will take place on Saturday, March 5 from noon to 2PM. This event is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served.

The exhibit focuses on the Green Man tile motif that is a hallmark of the library’s 19th century Queen Anne Revival structure. During the 2015 Fall semester, all of the students at Kellogg explored the symbolism and architectural significance of the Green Man throughout history. The image of the Green Man, a mythological folk spirit, can be found all over the world, including Europe, Iceland and parts of Asia. Art teacher Chris Hanley guided the students as they used a wide variety of materials to create these fascinating works, including ceramic clay, burlap and paper mache. The exhibit includes an artwork by each of the 72 K-8 students at the school.

2016 marks the Hunt Library’s 125th year of serving Falls Village and the surrounding northwest corner of Connecticut. The Green Man Project is the first event this year commemorating the library’s founding and opening in 1891. Other events will include a new Words & Music concert at Music Mountain in May, a community birthday party in August, and the presentation of a children’s book and the restored portraits of Catherine and Weltha Ann Hunt, the sisters who founded the library.

Hodgson 16 ecard (1)
The Artwall of the David M. Hunt Library in Falls Village, CT will open its 2016 schedule of exhibits with “Taking Flight: New Paintings by John Hodgson.” A reception for the artist will take place on Saturday, January 16 from 4pm to 6pm. This event is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served.

John Hodgson, a young and talented artist on the autism spectrum and a Falls Village resident, makes his art in his New York City studio with his teacher, Baris Gokturk. Taking Flight is a series he has been working on since the summer of 2015 when his fellow art students at JCC Manhattan worked on a group exhibit at the Hunt Library. This new series combines Hodgson’s abstract painting with collage elements of birds and nature. John was inspired by the natural environment in and around Falls Village and the clippings from bird and nature magazines that his mom, Laurie Hodgson, provided him. Through this, Hodgson created these compelling bird paintings, expanding his repertoire of visual language and art-making skills.

Since the beginning of John’s pursuit of art in 2008, he has had 12 solo exhibitions and has participated in several group exhibits. Several of John’s works are included in private collections across the United States as well as Turkey, Germany and Slovakia. John’s creative sessions include time spent learning classic brush stroke techniques as well as experimenting with non-traditional tools and methods. Time, movement and creation of an individual pictorial language through articulation of various painterly moves is the main focus of his paintings.

His other interests include running in Central Park, visiting museums and galleries with friends, hiking the Appalachian Trail and volunteer work. John currently enjoys volunteering at Orkestai Farm and at Materials for the Arts where he is featured in June’s 2014’s Volunteer Spotlight of the Month.

To learn more about John Hodgson and view his work visit www.parkbenchartist.com

12x12 2015 ecard

The Hunt Library in Falls Village will host the 5th edition of its popular year-end flash art exhibit, 12X12, on Saturday, December 12 with a birthday reception from 5pm to 7pm. Artworks are all in a 12” x 12” format, priced at $100 each, and sold off-the-wall. Works will be replaced on the wall as they are sold. Remaining art will be on display through Saturday, January 2. The reception is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served. A portion of the art sales will benefit the library.

This year’s exhibit celebrates the 5th Anniversary of 12X12 and the Hunt Library’s Artwall, both founded by Falls Village resident, artist and arist, Sergei Fedorjaczenko. Since the start of the Artwall, Sergei and other volunteers on the committee have scheduled 8 to 10 exhibits each year, exuberantly promoting, hosting, and skillfully installing the work of local artists in solo and group exhibits and organized community art events including Mr. Fedorjaczenko’s Dot Car project of 2012.

12X12 is presented in a uniform grid on the Hunt Artwall creating an art bazaar effect. Installed alphabetically by artist, all genre and media are jumbled up together, salon-style. Likely because of its 5th Anniversary, 12X12 has attracted a record number of artists this year. Among the unprecedented 65 artists are Lori Barker, Nancy Benson, Sue Berg, Feather Blass, Sharon Brisnehan, Margaret Buchte, Mary Anne Carley, Robert Cronin, Betsy Cole, Dave Colmar, Erica Crofut, Karen Culbreth, Lena Curtis, John Dildine, Virginia Dildine, Andy Doherty, Marsden Epworth, Sergei Fedorjaczenko, Zoe Fedorjaczenko, Florin Firimita, Richard Griggs, Frank Grusauskas, Sharon Hamilton, Hendon, John Hodgson, Shaari Horowitz, Joe Jablonski, Amanda Kauftheil, Charles Keil, Sallie Ketcham, Norma Kimmel, Michael Lampro, Lillian Lovitt, Danielle Mailer, Jennifer Markow, Joseph Markow, Randy McKee, Roger McKee, Patricia Medvecky, Lonnie Miles, Hope Mongeau, Karl Munson, Phyllis Nauts, Amelia de Neergaard, Charlie Noyes, Karin Noyes, Joan Palmer, Robert Andrew Parker, Jean Parks, Heath Prentis, Bernard Re, Jr., Max Richter, Ian Roig, Tom Schaefer, Trudy Schaelchli, Diane Schapira, Joel Schapira, Wendi Thitchener, Annike Timmermans, Vali Valenti, Kathy Wismar, Lilly Woodworth, and Judith Wyer.

Blass 15 ecard
BILL BLASS: Folk Art Paintings and Drawings
November 14 through December 5, 2015
Reception: Saturday, November 14, 4-6pm, Free
David M. Hunt Library, 63 Main Street, Falls Village, CT 06031, 860-824-7424

In November, the David M. Hunt Library in Falls Village, CT will host the exhibit, “Bill Blass: Folk Art Paintings and Drawings.” There will be a reception with wine and refreshments for the artist on Saturday, November 14 from 4 to 6pm. The exhibit will be on display through Saturday, December 5. For more information, call the library at 860-824-7424, drop by at 63 Main Street in Falls Village or visit www.huntlibrary.org.

Bill Blass, resident of Falls Village and a self-taught artist, creates landscapes and animal portraits on a variety of media including saws, plastic sheeting, and board. While Mr. Blass has made various studies over the years of the Falls Village Hydroelectric Station, his eye is also on the creatures that live in our woods such as foxes, birds, fish and the occasional mermaid. His exhibit is a survey of his work over the past few decades and includes works on paper, watercolor and ink, acrylic, and a flag-waving Uncle Sam statue.

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In September and October, the David M. Hunt Library in Falls Village, CT will host an exhibit titled “pARTners” featuring the artwork of painter Shaari Horowitz and furniture-maker Alistair Jones. There will be a reception with wine and refreshments for the artists on Saturday, September 19 from 4 to 6pm. The exhibit will be on display through Saturday, October 24. For more information, call the library at 860-824-7424, drop by at 63 Main Street in Falls Village or visit www.huntlibrary.org.

Here in rural northwestern Connecticut, Shaari Horowitz and Alistair Jones make the 150 foot commute from house to their 19th-century barn which serves as their workshop and studio. This Sharon couple’s workspaces are on separate floors and their constant collaboration is the most important tool in their relationship of love and work.

Shaari is a painter and graduate of Pratt Institute and has worked across the country as a muralist, specializing in the style of Trompe l’oeil. Alistair is a furniture-maker, born and apprenticed in the English tradition. He builds custom furniture in a wide range of styles and periods and his current passion is making traditional longbows. The couple bring together their backgrounds to create carved wood bowls with patinated gilding and intricately painted designs.

Shaari’s work in Trompe l’oeil and fine decorative painting has made room for the oil painting that she has turned to recently and which makes up much of the “pARTners” exhibit. She recently commented that, “This way of painting is new to me. It is the complete opposite of the process I follow daily, which involves lots of tight detail and intricate brushwork. I’m in love with the ease of connecting to the pure pleasure of laying down paint and dropping into the moment. No expectations, no laboring, just following the flow.”

Alistair creates handmade furniture influenced by period design and works with personal clients, designers, and architects. He enjoys mentoring future woodworkers, and building lasting, working relationships as well as heirloom furniture.

Partners_Horowitz_Sea Sequence III

Partners 15_Jones_Campeachy Chair

Long trip

Red Caboose 15 ecard rev
In August through mid-September the David M. Hunt Library Artwall will host “The Red Caboose,” a group exhibit of local artists. The artworks—literal, imaginative and abstract—take their inspiration from the New Haven line red caboose at the end of Main Street in Falls Village. A portion of art sale proceeds will benefit the Falls Village-Canaan Historical Society. An opening reception for the artists will take place at the library on Saturday, August 8 from 4 to 6pm. Refreshments will be served. “Red Caboose” will be on exhibit through September 12, 2015. David M. Hunt Library is located at 83 Main Street, Falls Village, CT 06031. For more information contact the library at 860-824-7424 or at huntlibrary.org.

The artists in “The Red Caboose” include Lori Barker, Margaret Buchte, Robert Cronin, John Dildine, Virginia Dildine, Andy Doherty, Sergei Fedorjaczenko, Marsha Hemus, John Hodgson, Lillian Lovitt, Carole McGuire, Joan Palmer, John Pirnak, Chris Robards, Wendi Thitchener, and Annike Timmermans.

Jeremy Dakin from the Historical Society will present a brief on Falls Village’s Red Caboose that was purchased in 1995 by the Falls Village/Canaan Historical Society with the help of several dedicated individuals. Over two years, they cleared land at the end of Main Street, lay the railroad ties and tracks, and installed the 1944 Red Caboose that served on the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad. The Red Caboose has become a local landmark and reminder of what can be accomplished by a group of local dedicated people.

June 27 through August 1, 2015
Reception: Saturday, June 27, 4pm to 6pm, Free
After six years of solo shows, John Hodgson is proud to introduce his friends and their artwork to the Falls Village community. In late June through July, the Hunt Library in Falls Village will host an exhibit of six visiting young adult art students from JCC Manhattan Center for Special Needs. A reception for the show, titled Long Trip, will be held on Saturday, June 27 from 4 to 6pm. Refreshments will be served. The exhibit will remain on display through August 1. This event is free and open to the public.

In April and June 2015, Connections Art Class traveled together to Falls Village, CT on daytrips, taking the train out of Grand Central and then to the library from Wassaic, documenting their experiences in visual works created on the way and at the Hunt Library. These works will be featured in the Long Trip exhibit on the library’s Artwall. In addition, the student’s work will include a series of drawings titled “Imaginary Spaces.”

Using a combined media approach (drawing, painting, collage, soft sculpture, and digital media) and a step by step multi-layered process, the JCC Connections Art Class provides a creative environment for the students to express themselves and interact with each other. The main goal of the curriculum is to enable students to learn not just the fundamentals of art making as a vessel of creative expression but also how to look at and discuss art works of their peers as a collective group. The program aims to nurture the creative individual expression of each student within a peer support system and group interaction.

Connections is supervised by painter and arts educator Baris Gokturk. The talented emerging artists in Long Trip include Andy Doherty, Masaki Fujitani, Amanda Kauftheil, Lonnie Miles, Chris Robards, and John Hodgson.

Wyer ecard

Judith Wyer’s exhibit, Painting People, will be on display at the David M. Hunt Library in Falls Village from May 15 through June 20. The subjects of these oil and watercolor portraits are African children from Ghana and Tanzania. A reception for the artist with refreshments will be held on Friday, May 15, from 6pm to 8pm. This event is free and open to the public.
Judith Wyer, a North Canaan resident, has referred to the act of painting as “extending and relishing the momentary.” This applies strongly here as Wyer’s source material for the African children in Painting People is the work of photographer Violaine Bachelier, a friend of the artist who shared her studies of children made during visits to Africa. Many of these paintings are small details of the photographs and in some instances, composites.

Wyer never met any of the children from Ghana or Tanzania in these paintings but says, “…I have felt as though I know them. Their images evoke something penetrating that transcends geography, time, and culture.” The paintings show the freedom of childhood through the subjects’ spectrum of physical emotion, from exuberant dancing and running to solitary contemplation.

Wyer commented on the creative process of the work in Painting People. “In most instances I found that painting them very quickly and spontaneously evoked the quality of a child. The image pared down to its essentials on a plain background in an “unfinished” state expresses the “to be finished” condition of childhood and their unrealized futures. Many of these children are displaced and in orphanages which also made a blank space surrounding them to be like the flux in which many of them live. The exception is the portrayal of Maasai children whose tribes are tied to their ancestral lands. There I found the harmony of place and individual. This is a facet of work which I am now pursuing.”

Judith Wyer studied at several institutions in New York including Brooklyn College, the Art Students League, National Academy of Design, and School of Visual Arts. She studied with Jacob Lawrence who was an early and lasting influence on the artist. Her work has been reviewed in the New York Times and she exhibits regularly.